11 December 2019

Books and Friends Must Be Chosen

Thomas Sturge Moore, "A Note on the Relation of the Printed Book as a Work of Art to Life," A Brief Account of the Origin of the Eragny Press (Hammersmith: The Eragny Press, 1903), p. 9:
It is vain to suppose that we can live with all and any; each palate has a different range, every appetite is limited; as with food, so with knowledge, so with affection. Books & friends must be chosen. Here is the answer to those who complain of expense: the wise sell all they have to buy what they really value. The result achieved by self-discipline and a sound nature is precisely parallel to the result achieved by the artist's painstaking and native gift; it is beauty. Nor are the two beauties independent, nor can they be without loss disassociated; for to starve the eye is to impoverish the spirit & «quand notre mérite baisse, notre goût baisse aussi».1 This then is why it is folly or misfortune to read ugly books, just as it is to read trash. This is the relation of the beautiful book to life. The alternative lies between effort to keep going and effort to create: every man fails who is not at least an artist in regard to himself; to aim at mere maintenance is to think to solve the problem of perpetual motion, a result which all who think must perceive to be insignificant even if it be not a dream.
A maxim from La Rochefoucauld (#379), translated by George H. Powell as "When our Merit lowers, our Taste lowers with it."


The opening pages to a selection of Pierre de Ronsard's
sonnets, published by The Eragny Press in 1902


Moore's Brief Account was a limited edition of 175 copies. At the moment there is only one for sale on Abebooks, at a price of $850.

Not unrelated: Brook Type