28 July 2017

The Reading Preferences of Older Scholars

George Haven Putnam, Books and Their Makers During the Middle Ages, Vol. I (New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1896), p. 243:
The trade of the Italian dealers in manuscripts was not brought to an immediate close by the introduction of printing. The older scholars still preferred the manuscript form for their books, and found it difficult to divest themselves of the impression that the less costly printed volumes were suited only for the requirements of the vulgar herd. There are even, as Kirchhoff points out,* instances of scribes preparing their manuscripts from printed "copy," and there are examples of these manuscript copies of printed books being made with such literalness as to include the imprint of the printer.
* There is a footnote which points to page 40 of Albrecht Kirchhoff's Geschichte des Deutschen Buchhandels im 17ten Jahrhundert (Berlin: 1849). I have not found a copy online. The source may be somewhere in the second volume of Kirchhoff's Beitr├Ąge zur Geschichte des deutschen Buchhandels (Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung, 1853), but I'm too lazy to check.