27 June 2014

No Handouts

Émile Zola, "L’argent dans la littérature", Messager de l'Europe (March 1880), quoted in Frederic Taber Cooper's The Craftsmanship of Writing (New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1911), p. 15:
The State owes nothing to young writers; the mere fact of having written a few pages does not entitle them to pose as martyrs, because no one will print their work. A shoemaker who has made his first pair of shoes does not force the government to sell them for him. It is the workman's place to dispose of his work to the public. And if he can't do it, if he is a nobody, he remains unknown through his own fault, and quite justly so.
A related post: The Sons of Joy